Amber Heard chases insurance companies

US actors Johnny Depp and Amber Heard broke up in 2017 in an eventful manner. The couple’s ‘harassment’ and ‘slander’ cases were concluded on 1 June.

In the case in the US state of Virginia, the jury found the famous actor right and ruled that Amber Heard should pay 8.3 million dollars to his ex-wife.

PARTS WAYS WITH HIS LAWYER

Heard dismissed the lawyers who defended him after the lawsuit was settled against him. Elaine Charlson Bredehoft, who represented the 36-year-old actor in the six-week defamation lawsuit, parted ways with Heard.

Lawyers David L. Axelrod and Jay Ward Brown, who represented The New York Times earlier this year in a libel suit against 2008 vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin, will take over from Bredehoft on appeal.

According to the news in DailyMail; Heard’s spokesperson used the following statements in a statement:
When it comes to protecting the fundamental right to freedom of speech, we look at the jury’s decision as ‘just the end of the beginning, not the beginning of the end’. A different court requires different representation, especially now that so much new evidence has come to light.

Bredehoft, Heard’s former attorney, said: “This is the perfect time to hand over the task to someone else. I promised Amber and her new team that I would fully cooperate and assist her as they navigate the path to success.”

After all, Amber Heard also hired Kirk Pasich as part of its legal team to ‘force’ two insurance companies to pay millions of dollars in damages and court costs.

$8 MILLION COST BEFORE THE CASE STARTS

According to Puck News; Amber Heard’s expenses rose to over $8 million even before the tumultuous Virginia trial began. Heard’s team, on the other hand, wants these fees to be covered by insurance companies.

INSURANCE COMPANIES DO NOT PAY IN CASE CUSTOMERS COMMIT A DELIVERABLE CRIME

Insurance companies had refused to pay Amber Heard’s expenses. This was due to Heard’s conviction that he had acted in ‘bad faith’. According to the laws of the state of California; insurance companies can avoid paying their customers if they ‘deliberately commit a crime’.

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